Cluster Munitions Monitor Thirteenth Annual Report: Quarter of All of the Victims of Cluster Munitions Globally are in Syria, Which Remains the Worst in the World

SNHR is a Member of the International Coalition for the Elimination of Cluster Munition and Its Main Source of Data for Syria

Cluster Munitions Monitor Thirteenth Annual Report: Quarter of All of the Victims of Cluster Munitions Globally are in Syria, Which Remains the Worst in the World

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Paris – Syrian Network for Human Rights:
The International Campaign to Ban Landmines – Cluster Munition Coalition (ICBL-CMC) recently released its thirteenth annual report on monitoring the use of cluster munitions worldwide. The CMC is a global civil society campaign working to eradicate cluster munitions, prevent further casualties from them, and put an end to the suffering caused by these weapons.

The Syrian Network for Human Rights (SNHR)as a member of this international coalition, has contributed periodic data documented by our working team on the ground in Syria. The data includes: information on the victims that have been killed or injured; the locations of these incidents, and the parties responsible for the use of cluster munition in each case, where possible. These parties are limited to either the Syrian regime or Russian forces, since we haven’t documented any use of cluster munition by other parties to the conflict in Syria over the twelve years of the conflict.

As we’ve done every year, the Syrian Network for Human Rights distributes reviews, and comments on the annual report. The following are the main findings of this year’s report on Syria: as every year since 2012, Syria continues to be the worst country in the world in terms of the death toll from cluster munitions. The highest national death toll globally in 2021 was in Syria, where 37 victims were killed by cluster munitions, constituting nearly 25% of the total number of victims worldwide in 2021. The report indicated that two-thirds of these victims were children, adding that all the victims in 2021 were killed or injured by the explosion of remnants of cluster munitions that were used previously, making it the first year without casualties from new cluster munition attacks since the first documented use of these munitions in Syria in 2012.

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